Requiescat in Pace, Andrew Greeley

250px-Andrew_GreeleyGuest post by Sheridan Lorraine

Father Andrew Greeley —¬†whose novels and essays I’ve read for years — and who helped me come to terms with my ideas about Christianity – died today. I never made it to Chicago to meet him, one of the few authors I’ve ever really wanted to meet. More than any minister or preacher I’ve ever listened to or read, Father Greeley made me believe in the humanity of Christ and the paternal love of a creator, and he made faith real, human, accepting of all, and yes — erotic. The world is a sadder place without this author and priest.

Blake’s “The Clod and the Pebble” Set to Music

The band Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin has set William Blake’s “The Clod and the Pebble” to music:

Interesting that these tend to come from indie bands…

Blake Inspired Art in Cincinnati, OH

New exhibit of Blake-inspired artworks coming up in Cincinnati, OH.  Must see.Blake Inspired Art

A Humanist Apologizes to Numbers – The Chronicle Review – The Chronicle of Higher Education

photo_37231_landscape_large

Fun read by a creative writing professor about his relationship to numbers. I think the recent institutional separation of arts and sciences causes us to forget the historical relationship between the two. The original seven liberal arts consisted of three studies of language and ideas, the trivium — grammar, rhetoric, and dialectic — while the other four focused on either theoretical or applied math in the forms of arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music. It never was about either developing language or math skills. Each one helps you understand the other. Intensive study of grammar and poetics, at some point, makes you feel like you’re studying algebra:

A Humanist Apologizes to Numbers – The Chronicle Review – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

Leave it to Stephen Colbert…

Colbert This week in higher ed on the web we have a wonderfully pithy observation by Stephen Colbert that reminds us that cutting education funding is to sell out our own children, and a reminder of the state of higher education today in the form of the first SAT test. Enjoy.

%d bloggers like this: