Millennial College Students Seem Comfortable with Risk

Pay attention if you’re a college student — avoid debt as much as possible.

Finding My College

Recent volatility in the stock market is a reminder that people handle risks differently. Some people wouldn’t dream of investing in equities and subjecting their capital to potential principal loss. Others are high flyers, routinely putting markers down on stocks with high potential on the upside as well as the downside. Others run scared at the first sign of trouble. Others stay the course, grounded in a long-term perspective (or inertia is some cases).

Beyond our individual investment philosophies and strategies, there are many decisions in life that test our appetite for risk. Indeed, most potential courses of action entail some level of risk. Sometimes we try our best to assess those risks objectively (as objectively as possible, that is, given our seemingly inescapable biases and preconceptions), and sometimes we rationalize them away. It occurred to me that my concern with student debt is fundamentally a concern about our risk…

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Author: James Rovira

Dr. James Rovira is higher education professional with twenty years experience in the field in teaching, administration, and advising roles. He is also an interdisciplinary scholar and writer whose works include fiction, poetry, and scholarship exploring the intersections of literature and philosophy, literature and psychology, literary theory, and music and literature.. His books include Women in Rock/Women in Romanticism (in development), David Bowie and Romanticism (forthcoming 2022), Writing for College and Beyond (a first-year composition textbook (Lulu 2019)), Reading as Democracy in Crisis: Interpretation, Theory, History (Lexington Books 2019), Rock and Romanticism: Blake, Wordsworth, and Rock from Dylan to U2 (Lexington Books, 2018); Rock and Romanticism: Post-Punk, Goth, and Metal as Dark Romanticisms (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018); and Blake and Kierkegaard: Creation and Anxiety (Continuum/Bloomsbury, 2010). See his website at jamesrovira.com for details.

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