Book Chat: The Life and Work of Diane Hoeveler

On 9 December 2016 Romantic Circles Reviews and Receptions sponsored a book chat devoted to the life and work of Dr. Diane Hoeveler hosted by James Rovira.

Romantic Circles Reviews and Receptions is an online, open-access, peer-reviewed website devoted to Romantic-era studies. Diane Hoeveler worked out of Marquette University, and her work focused on the Brontës, feminism, and the gothic in eighteenth and nineteenth-century literature.

The chat was held from about 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. ET. Three of Diane’s previous collaborators joined the chat to discuss Diane as a friend, a person, and a scholar.

Participants and their topics included

  • Dr. James Rovira — Chair and Associate Prof. of English, Mississippi College: Host.
  • Dr. Deborah Morse — Vera W. Barkley Professor of English, College of William and Mary: her own Brontë projects with Diane. Dr. Morse was ill, so James Rovira read her paper.
  • Dr. Beth Lau — Prof. of English, Cal State Long Beach: Romantic Androgyny and the Brontë project
  • Dr. Angela H Wright — Professor of English, The University of Sheffield: The Gothic Ideology and other works.

We used the platform Zoom for the chat, which was recorded and then archived with YouTube at the link above.

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Happy Birthday, William Blake

Today would be the 258th birthday of the British poet and printmaker William Blake. If you’d like to explore some Blake resources on this website, check out the online gallery for the Blake in the Heartland exhibit and my page of Blake resources, which has a PowerPoint on Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell and a Prezi on Blake’s sources. You might also want to check out this description of my monograph. You can also select the “William Blake” link in the category cloud to the left to find more posts about Blake.

I was first introduced to the poetry of William Blake through the song “William Blake,” which appears on the Daniel Amos album Vox Humana. That song — which plays in the background of the Prezi mentioned above — inspired me to run over to the nearest B. Dalton bookseller and buy a copy of The Viking Portable Blake. I haven’t been bored with him since.

Updates on Publishing…

First, if you ever see any of my poems disappear, that’s because I’ve submitted them for consideration to a venue that does not consider work published elsewhere. If they’re accepted I will provide links to their new venue, and if not, I can make them visible again.

Next, my latest review has recently gone live at Romantic Circles Reviews and Receptions. It’s of David Sigler’s very good monograph, Sexual Enjoyment in British Romanticism: Gender and Psychoanalysis 1753-1835. It’s great to see RCRR up and running again after a hiatus of a few years, especially since it’s following a model that I think scholarly publishing needs to take in the future: peer-reviewed, open-access, and freely accessible to the public.

Rock and Romanticism Blog Up

I’ve set up a blog for the edited anthology Rock and Romanticism: 

https://rockandromanticism.wordpress.com/ 

All future updates will be posted to the blog, which has the CFP, information for contributors, ideas for future papers, videos of the songs featured in the anthology (building that up now) and, soon to come, a contributor list and a music player. My two previous posts about the anthology are still available on this site, but that information has been updated and better organized on the new blog.

CFP (Anthology): Rock and Romanticism

CFP: Rock and Romanticism

NOTES: 

  1. I have set up a blog dedicated to the Rock and Romanticism anthology: https://rockandromanticism.wordpress.com/. When this page is no longer pinned to the top of this blog, all future updates on the anthology will have been migrated to that location. 

2. The August 1st deadline for proposals has passed. However, I plan to send my first proposal out to a publisher by August 15th at the latest, so I can still accept proposals through August 8th. Please contact me by August 8th if you have an idea but cannot send me a proposal until after August 8th.

3. This page is continually being updated as I receive proposals or ideas for proposals. Please check the list below for topics covered. I am happy to accept more than one essay about the same figure, but of course these essays need to take different approaches. 

4. I was on the road from July 5th to July 14th. There may have been delays responding to your queries and proposals during that time. Please accept my apologies.  

The editor of Rock and Romanticism is soliciting essays about the ways in which rock music, broadly defined, expands, interprets, restates, and conflicts with Romanticism, broadly defined. “Rock music” as a category will be extended to include all popular music since the 1950s, including but not limited to rock, varieties of metal, R&B, soul, varieties of punk, folk, techno, progressive rock, indie, new wave, alternative, psychedelic, industrial, gothic, funk, country, and blues. If the music has been written or performed since the 1950s and you’re wondering if it fits, the answer is “yes.” [1] For the purposes of this study, “Romanticism” will also be broadly defined, considering trans-European, trans-Atlantic, and global Romanticisms as well as Romanticism in literature, art, and music.

You can see a list matching potential musicians and Romantic-era literary figures, a provisional bibliography, and a sense of how I’m theorizing Romanticism on the blog post “Romanticism and Rock.”

Papers might consider

  • women in rock and women in Romanticism;
  • lyric poetry and song lyrics or song lyrics as lyric poetry;
  • readings of rock and Romanticism that compare
    • conditions between Europe during the Napoleonic wars and conditions in the post-McCarthy era and/or post 9-11 United States,
    • the 1960s or later Ireland or the UK, or
    • 1960s or later continental Europe, including Eastern Europe and the Baltic states (any possible essays on Rammstein and Romanticism?);
  • the gothic in literature and in music;
  • opera and the rock opera;
  • drug use, drug literature, and drug music of the eighteenth, nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries;
  • the pastoral in Romantic literature and in rock music;
  • adaptations, interpretations, direct responses to, and performances of Romantic-era texts by twentieth-century and later musicians;
  • the figure of Satan in Romanticism and in rock;
  • protest literature and protest music;
  • sexual identity in Romanticism and rock.

Ideal papers will theorize or historicize their subjects in a way that places rock music in a coherent dialog with Romantic-era art, literature, or music, contributing to a consideration of the boundaries or definition(s) of “Romanticism” as an artistic mode while also considering the implications of chronological, national, social, sexual, and/or economic difference. Papers from contemporary artists/musicians reflecting upon the influence of Romantic-era art, literature, or music upon their work are also welcome.

Please email a 250-500 word proposal that includes your name, title, institutional affiliation (if applicable), mailing address, email address, and a brief, updated CV to jamesrovira@gmail.com by August 1st, 2015. Completed papers, which should be within the 5000-7000 word range, are expected by November 15, 2015.

You can see a list of artists and poets with a provisional bibliography on the blog post “Romanticism and Rock.”

I have received notice of interest or proposals for the following figures:

Musician/Artist Romantic Era Connection Status
The Beatles/Sgt. Pepper’s Wordsworth Proposal received and accepted
David Bowie, Ziggy Stardust Blake and Keats Proposal received and accepted
David Bowie and Brian Eno (late 70s) Wordsworth/Coleridge, Lyrical Ballads Proposal received and accepted
Nick Cave Romanticism/gothic and sublime Awaiting proposal
Nick Cave Romanticism/transgressive artist Proposal received and accepted
60s Dylan (not comprehensively) Blake and the Beat poets Proposal received and accepted
Dylan Keats and Shelley, or just Shelley Proposal received and accepted
Woody Guthrie, Ballads of Sacco and Vanzetti Theorizes Guthrie’s ballads using Sayre and Lowy’s “Figures of Romantic Anti-Capitalism” Proposal received and accepted.
The Herd (early Peter Frampton), perf. Paradise Lost Milton and Blake Proposal received and accepted.
Mick Jagger, 1969 Jagger reading Shelley’s Adonais Proposal received and accepted
Iron Maiden Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” Awaiting proposal
Aimee Mann Mann as a Romantic figure as theorized by Cavill Proposal received and accepted
Marilyn Manson’s Triptych Blake and Bryon Proposal received and accepted
Morrisey and Bowie Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Proposal received and accepted
Norwegian Black Metal Primitivism/return to nature Awaiting proposal
The Pretenders, Pretenders William Blake, Vision of the Daughters of Albion, comparing female responses to male aggression and passivity. Proposal received and accepted.
Martha Redbone’s Roots Project William Blake Proposal received and accepted
Lou Reed, The Raven Edgar Allan Poe Proposal received and accepted
Rolling Stones, “Sympathy for the Devil” Milton’s Satan Awaiting proposal
Rush Rush and Romanticism Proposal received and accepted
U2, Songs of Innocence Blake Proposal received and accepted
U2, Songs of Innocence and Leonard Cohen Blake Proposal received and accepted
Van Morrison VM himself as a Romantic poet, comp. to several Romantic-era figures, particularly Blake Proposal received and accepted
Various: the 60s Various: the 60s as a Romantic era Proposal received and accepted
Various: 60’s era apocalypse Various: the Romantic era and apocalypse Proposal received and accepted
Various: 80s New Romanticism Various: English Romanticism Proposal received and accepted
Various: a contribution by the author/director of a staged version of Werther set to music by Lou Reed, Florence and the Machine, Rhianna, etc. Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther Proposal received and accepted.
Various: Pathetic fallacy in rock and Romanticism. AFI, Finch, La Dispute, etc. Various: Blake and Wordsworth Proposal received and accepted
Various: songs of the open road, including Joplin, Springsteen, Dylan, and Berry Various: Songs for the Open Road anthology Proposal received and accepted
Tom Verlaine/ post-punk Romantic-era responses to Napoleon Proposal received and accepted
Women in Rock (Janis Joplin, Joni Mitchell, Carole King, Stevie Nicks) Women in Romanticism (Mary Shelley and Charlotte and Emily Brontë) Proposal received and accepted
Neil Young and Jackson Browne These musicians as Romantic poets, compared to Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats Proposal received and accepted
4AD Records’s This Mortal Coil project (includes The  Cocteau Twins) Walpole, Beckford, Shelley and Lewis Proposal received and accepted

[1] Except for disco, because disco sucks.